Can Investigational Drug Benefit Lung Cancer Surgery Patients?

Trial Objective

Can Investigational Drug Benefit Lung Cancer Surgery Patients?The purpose of this clinical trial is to see if it is better to receive an investigational medication or no further treatment after surgery (and possibly chemotherapy) to remove non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Two-thirds of study participants will receive the investigational medication and the other third will receive a placebo that looks like the study medication but does not contain an active drug. This research is being done because there is currently no standard treatment for patients with NSCLC who have had their cancer removed by surgery (and possibly received follow-up chemotherapy). The study medication has been shown to shrink tumors in animals, but has only been studied in a few people.

Enrollment

This trial is active and currently recruiting.

Who Can Participate

Adults with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that was completely removed with surgery who may or may not have received chemotherapy after surgery. Participants cannot have lung cancer that involves a standard anti-cancer treatment at their current stage.

Age: 18+    Gender: Any Gender


Estimated Time Commitment

Up to 12 months

Treatment with the investigational medication or the placebo will last for about 12 months. All participants will be seen at 4 and 12 weeks after the end of the dosing period. Follow-up visits will then occur every 12 weeks for up to two years, then every six months for one year, and annually thereafter. The visits should take about 1.5 hours each. Our researchers would like to keep track of participants’ health for the rest of their lives to see long-term effects of participating in the study.



Compensation

Not Provided

Trial Contact

For more information, contact:

Jami Henriksen, Trial Coordinator

Jami Henriksen
303.398.1233

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Trial Location

National Jewish Main Campus, Denver, CO

Trial Sponsors

NCIC New had happen Group (Canadian equivalent of NIH)

Principal Investigators


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